Manuela Granziol

Liminal Place

In my recent work I have produced sculptures and installations, in which I disrupt the regular arrangement of sentences and words. The resulting lack of order is then manipulated in such a way to obtain a new tangible reality. My aim, with these projects, is to explore the unknown realms between language and not-language, between communication and silence. Silence is often seen as the reverse of language, however silence is an integral part of the message, as not only does it divide and link sentences, but it is also to be found inside of them and is, furthermore, inhabited by them as well. To communicate is to put into language (spoken, written, digital, visual, sound), a process which establishes the boundary between static order and incomprehensible chaos. This boundary between order and chaos is constantly in a state of flux and forever being redrawn.

Finding relatable meaning in today’s flow of data plays an important role in understanding the world we live in and our place in it. Information overload may cause stress and fragmentation. Silence may often seem the only alternative in this threatening disorder. However this data glut also contains the opportunity for creativity and connection.

With the digitalization of the media, our own semiotic production is becoming more and more complex and abundant. Signs are proliferating. There is hardly a space without writing in it or a quiet time to be found. Silence stands in the way of the speeding up of life. Additionally, the built-in silences in speech and writing are being shortened or eliminated by new media technologies. In fact, our knowledge is increasingly experienced, shared, learned, recorded and stored digitally. Our identities are increasingly shaped by faster modes of communication and by the footprints created in the process. When new signs take the place of silence, the relationship between communication and silence becomes more intimate, more microcosmic, and takes on altogether new forms.

The figure is retreating from the sensory overload in order to interpret and connect this chaotic information glut. The pause or introspection is paramount not only to understand the contrasting, fragmented flow of information she is continuously subjected to, but more importantly, the ‘thinking pause’ also becomes a constitutive element of thought itself and therefore of creation. The moment of inspiration comes when chaos and its absence come together.

The figure’s outer layer, made of parcels of text and images, aims at capturing the complexity of human beings, as well as placing subjectivity in correlation with social and cultural factors. In this project the fragments of knowledge become part of the figure; they seem to flow into each other to form a new whole. This new whole, however, is never static or finished. As an innumerable amount of events and encounters concur to form and shape every individual one could also say that human beings are made of various fragments (memories, images, text and people we meet) and therefore made of parts of others. Accepting the fact that we are made of parts of others, may involve dealing with a subjectivity, which expands beyond the subject itself to include otherness and chaos within.

FACTSHEET:

Abmessungen : 300 cm x 200 cm x 385 cm (Height, Width, Depth)
Gewicht : 100 kg
Jahr : 2018
Material : Mixed Media, Papier, Installation
Stil : modern, poetisch, sozial, monumental

Manuela Granziol

Manuela is inspired by a variety of sources from literature, philosophy, art history as well as images and text circulated in traditional and screen based media. In her artwork she incorporates themes of power, war and loss. Many of her projects draw attention to the innumerable events and encounters that collectively form and shape every individual, expanding subjectivity beyond the subject itself to include ‘otherness’ within. Her artworks become then a vehicle with which to visually express not only the uncertainty and vulnerability of human existence, but also to convey the fluidity and multiplicity of the self, which she addresses through the affect, created by subject matter, form, materials, process and presentation.

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Inferno
War and power have been recurring theme in Manuela's practice. During the Iraq war she was particularly concerned with the meaning of words such as ‘war’ and ‘peace’, and the different roles played out by ‘women’ and men’ in war time. In her work she questioned weather and why we, as individuals, are capable of such acts, Although we may recoil in horror at newspaper reports of atrocities carried out by human beings upon each other in the name of ‘war’. If we are the rational beings we often define ourselves as, why do we continue to repeat the same fruitless patterns? To explore these themes she uses photography, turning the media itself on its head, by deconstructing the conventional photographic form through the manipulation, cutting, bending and knitting of images to take the photograph beyond its traditional two-dimensional confines.
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Save the Last Dance for Me
Knitted Photographs In "Save the Last Dance for Me" the motivation to reproduce objects suggestive of the female body was prompted by the news of the Darfur Genocide, especially with reference to the mass slaughter and rape of Darfuri women and children in Western Sudan. The killings began in 2003 and was the first genocide in the 21st century. Moreover, the Darfur genocide, an appalling, brutal and systematic attack against humanity seemed to evade the attentive eye of the international media, and the suffering of the Darfurian people was felt as a distant echo in the West. The artwork "Save the Last Dance for Me' could be seen as a reminder of the lost opportunities to take action and stand against this atrocity.  In this artwork I have knitted together images of Darfurian girls and women cultivating farmlands or seeking water and firewood with their traumatic stories of mass rape and violence. With this artwork I draw attention to the fact that rape and sexual abuse are not just a by-product of war but are used as weapons of war, as an orchestrated combat tool often used in ethnic conflicts as a way for attackers to perpetuate their social control and redraw ethnic boundaries. 
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Sunday Afternoon, Knitted Photographs
Manuela Granziol
Fragments, Knitted Photographs
Manuela Granziol
Logistics of Power, Screenprints on Wood, Installation View
Manuela Granziol
The Key Question is Never About Truth
In the series "the Key Question is Never about Truth" , I have deconstructed the conventional use and meaning of newspapers as objects of information by cutting them into strips. While I was cutting the newspapers, I felt as if I was peeling back the outer, superficial layer of their messages to reveal the secret spaces beneath. By knitting the newspaper’s strips together, I have created a new information object, which has a different structure, context and message. In this way the words, the overload of inconsistent information in the newspapers are reassembled to obtain a still existence: a tangible presence that arises silence.
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
125451 Words: A Thesis submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy
In this work, as well as in "The Question is Never Abut the Truth" the regular arrangement of sentences and words is disrupted. The resulting lack of order or “shredded chaos” is then manipulated in such a way to obtain a new tangible reality, in which chaos and silence cease to function as binary opposites. Chaos and silence become symbiotic and are dependent on one another. My aim, with these projects, is to explore the unknown realms between language and not-language, between communication (and its chaos causing misunderstandings), and silence (the chaos of the unsaid). In this context, chaos can be seen as a constitutive element of signs production in both language and silence. Silence is often seen as the reverse of language, however silence is an integral part of language, as not only does it divide and link sentences, but it is also to be found inside of them and is, furthermore, inhabited by them as well. For "125451 Words: A Thesis submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy" I have painstakingly glued together, layer after layer, the shredded and jumbled words that once formed my thesis. It took me four years to select, order the existing knowledge on the topic and to formulate my contribution. I spent interminable hours determining the right boundaries between static order and incomprehensible chaos. Through shredding and reshaping my thesis into a still and impenetrable object I have drawn attention to the fact that the boundary between order and chaos is constantly in a state of flux and forever being redrawn.
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Puzzled
Puzzle game
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Holz
Hayat
With this sculpture the artist draws attention to the plight of Syrian children. Hayat is an Arabic name that means life. Hayat could be any ordinary girl in Syria, not so different from a little girl in the “West”. Before the civil war, she went to school, practiced her faith, played with her friends and went about the business of everyday life. Since then, her life has been turned upside down. She had to leave her home. Every day is a struggle to survive and she is growing up in a world filled with violence, danger and uncertainty. The sculpture “Hayat” is part of the series “Language as Home” in which the artist explores how the different languages we come into contact during our life influence our own identity and self-perception. The movement of people from one home to another for different purposes, such as conflicts, natural disasters, employment or education, effects the way we relate to our mother tongue, which is often like the skin, unconditionally present and so easily injured. The encounter with a new language is a decisive experience and make us realise that the world looks different in another language than it does in our own one. As writer Herta Mueller suggests “behind every language there are other eyes”. This allows the discovery of a linguistic universe different from the native inherited linguistic space. The mother tongue ceases to be the measure of all things as its view is continuously confronted with the “seen differently” of the other language/s. This divergence between words and things then creates a space between languages, which becomes a metaphor for a fragmented identity. When you leave your homeland you also leave behind the comfort of the so well known mother tongue. Is moving into a different linguistic space an enrichment? Is it threatening? What are the implications if your mother tongue is the language of the enemy, or the language of uprooted and unwanted?
Manuela Granziol, Naturstoffe, Mixed Media
Raja
With this sculpture the artist draws attention to the plight of Syrian children. Raja could be any ordinary girl in Syria, not so different from a little girl in the “West”. Before the civil war, she went to school, practiced her faith, played with her friends and went about the business of everyday life. Since then, her life has been turned upside down. She had to leave her home. Every day is a struggle to survive and she is growing up in a world filled with violence, danger and uncertainty. The sculpture Raja ans “Hayat” are part of the series “Language as Home” in which the artist explores how the different languages we come into contact during our life influence our own identity and self-perception. The movement of people from one home to another for different purposes, such as conflicts, natural disasters, employment or education, effects the way we relate to our mother tongue, which is often like the skin, unconditionally present and so easily injured. The encounter with a new language is a decisive experience and make us realise that the world looks different in another language than it does in our own one. As writer Herta Mueller suggests “behind every language there are other eyes”. This allows the discovery of a linguistic universe different from the native inherited linguistic space. The mother tongue ceases to be the measure of all things as its view is continuously confronted with the “seen differently” of the other language/s. This divergence between words and things then creates a space between languages, which becomes a metaphor for a fragmented identity. When you leave your homeland you also leave behind the comfort of the so well known mother tongue. Is moving into a different linguistic space an enrichment? Is it threatening? What are the implications if your mother tongue is the language of the enemy, or the language of uprooted and unwanted?
Manuela Granziol, Sonstige, Mixed Media
Liminal place
paper parcels tight with string
Manuela Granziol, Sonstige, Papier
Between Panic and Bordoom
Mosaic of paper tiles
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Soliloquio
With the sculpture Soliloquio the artist aim to coveys the way children and young people's world has changed during COVID19 lockdowns. As their entire life took place in a bedroom, many of them reported serious loneliness and social anxiety. The surface of the sculptures is crucial to the meaning of the artwork: the outer layer is constructed as a mosaic of paper tiles. The paper parcels are tied together with thread.
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
untitled
This ear is made of parcels of the pages of an Italian dictionary. The work is part of the series "Language as Home".
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Silenzio Stracciato
Portrait bust
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
Ignosi
Long ago there was a demigodess called Ignosi, whose knowledge was pure and immeasurable. She knew everything of all creation, gods, heroes, and man. She was associated with science, speech, literature, the arts and inspiration. She was also the gatekeeper for the process of gaining knowledge. However, she was not allowed to to communicate this awareness to humanity. ...So powerful and beautiful were her skills, that not only did she become the most enlightened creature on earth, but she also felt compelled to share her learning with humans, even though that had been strictly forbidden by the Gods. Ignosi defied the gods and became pregnant in order to sow the seeds of 'cognition' on earth. This caught the attention of the gods who believed that humans with this insight and strength could soon become a threat to them. For this outrageous act of disobedience against the will of the Gods, Ignosi was condemned to death by decapitation. In her last defiant act before passing however, she cleverly managed to communicate fragments of her wisdom to her twin daughters in her womb. Through them, fragments of knowledge and awareness seeped through humanity.
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
talking to you
parcels of paper
Manuela Granziol, Mixed Media, Papier
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